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Brooklyn Nine-Nine meets sibling (and actor) rivalry with “The Golden Child” Brooklyn Nine-Nine meets sibling (and actor) rivalry with “The Golden Child”

After working an impressive balance between light comedy and serious real-life issues in last week’s “He Said, She Said,” Brooklyn Nine-Nine returns to straight up silliness with this week’s “The Golden Child.” Sure, this week’s A-plot comes from a real place as well—sibling rivalry, parental favoritism, being framed…

“He Said, She Said” is an honest, funny, exemplary episode of Brooklyn Nine-Nine “He Said, She Said” is an honest, funny, exemplary episode of Brooklyn Nine-Nine

In terms of greatly hyped Brooklyn Nine-Nine episodes, I’ll admit that I was dreading “He Said, She Said.” It wasn’t necessarily that I thought Brooklyn Nine-Nine would screw it up—as this has been promoted as its “#MeToo episode”—but I was reasonably worried “He Said, She Said” would lack a balance in terms of both…

A “splashy” Brooklyn Nine-Nine defines the “Four Movements” of Gina Linetti A “splashy” Brooklyn Nine-Nine defines the “Four Movements” of Gina Linetti

“Four Movements” is a pretty straightforward Brooklyn Nine-Nine episode: Gina promises everyone in the Nine-Nine “a signature Gina moment” over her last two weeks working there. The episode itself turns the four movements of “The Linexit”—the dance piece introduced in the cold open, with each movement taking 45…

With “The Tattler,” Brooklyn Nine-Nine takes things all the way back to the ’90s With “The Tattler,” Brooklyn Nine-Nine takes things all the way back to the ’90s

“I enjoyed myself. I can’t wait to go home and tell Kevin, ‘You can have fun, without being productive.’”

Brooklyn Nine-Nine solves the mystery of "Hitchcock & Scully," as well as class relations Brooklyn Nine-Nine solves the mystery of "Hitchcock & Scully," as well as class relations

“Hitchcock & Scully” isn’t all about Hitchcock and Scully, but it’s a no-brainer that it is and will live on to be the most memorable part of this episode. That would be the case even if it weren’t for the episode title, honestly. Terry, Rosa, and Amy’s “upstairs vs. downstairs” people plot is a footnote—a funny one,…

With “Honeymoon,” it’s a new year, new network for a new-ish Brooklyn Nine-Nine With “Honeymoon,” it’s a new year, new network for a new-ish Brooklyn Nine-Nine

“Well, from the look on my face I’m sure you can guess what it says.”

In Riverdale, the world revolves around “The Man In Black” In Riverdale, the world revolves around “The Man In Black”

Last season, Riverdale had an episode that still stands out for how different it was from the rest of the season and series, “Chapter Twenty: Tales From The Darkside.” While it’s an episode that ultimately exists with the knowledge after the fact that the series couldn’t quite live up to the plot points, standards,…

In Riverdale, a manhunt has nothing on gargoyles, gangs, and... gargoyle gangs In Riverdale, a manhunt has nothing on gargoyles, gangs, and... gargoyle gangs

“Chapter Forty-One: Manhunter” is one of those Riverdale episodes where, if you were to explain a large portion of it to anyone who knows absolutely nothing about Riverdale, you would sound very out of touch with reality. That’s technically true of every episode, especially after the first season, but imagine having…

It's time to question Supergirl's concept of good and bad It's time to question Supergirl's concept of good and bad

Supergirl wears its political and ideological leanings on its sleeve. That’s just part of the package when you watch the series, and to expect something else—especially four seasons in—is to simply expect a different show. Subtlety isn’t its particular brand of creative currency, but that only really becomes a problem…

Riverdale’s blast to the past reminds us only real ‘90s kids worship the Gargoyle King Riverdale’s blast to the past reminds us only real ‘90s kids worship the Gargoyle King

In a way, every single episode of Riverdale is a gimmick episode. So when the show goes out of its way to create a very clear “gimmick episode” (for example, the Carrie: The Musical episode), it feels even more like an out-of-body experience than your standard, already pretty “out there” episode of Riverdale. But now…

Everyone in Riverdale is just trying their best, as troubling as that is Everyone in Riverdale is just trying their best, as troubling as that is

Because of Riverdale’s second season, it’s hard to watch these early season three episodes without waiting for the other shoe to drop. As promising as these stories are right now, there’s still the sense that whatever the answers behind mysteries like the Gargoyle King and the seizures and The Farm are, they won’t…

Riverdale meets the Gargoyle King, the stuff of nightmares & secret pacts Riverdale meets the Gargoyle King, the stuff of nightmares & secret pacts

After last week’s relatively strong premiere, Riverdale keeps the momentum going with “Chapter Thirty-Seven: Fortune and Men’s Eyes.” And this episode truly is non-stop tonal shifts, as the culmination of Archie’s terrible, no good, very bad summer is a walk in the park compared to the Dark Dungeons-esque mystery…

Riverdale returns for the official end of summer, innocence, and dark Archie Riverdale returns for the official end of summer, innocence, and dark Archie

Even at its lowest points, there’s always something to appreciate about Riverdale. Even after a sophomore slump, there’s still a reason to long for the show during hiatus. And an episode like “Chapter Thirty-Six: Labor Day” explains why that is: It’s because Riverdale is the type of show where things like a murder…

With “Every Potato Has A Receipt,” it’s the end of the GLOW as we know it With “Every Potato Has A Receipt,” it’s the end of the GLOW as we know it

“Every Potato Has A Receipt” is like a rush of adrenaline, and that appears to be GLOW’s standard when it comes to its season finales and the big shows G.L.O.W. puts on. Honestly, the finales are also the points in the show that really strain believability in terms of the proper wrestling of this time period…

With “Rosalie,” GLOW reluctantly prepares to say goodbye With “Rosalie,” GLOW reluctantly prepares to say goodbye

Even with the future of G.L.O.W. hanging in the balance, “Rosalie” is somewhat of a cool down episode after the terrific—but often stressful—run of recent episodes this season. And just like in wrestling, sometimes a cool down is just what you need before the main event. So taking the back-to-school idea of GLOW …

With "The Good Twin," GLOW chooses to wrestle (and sing) like nobody's watching With "The Good Twin," GLOW chooses to wrestle (and sing) like nobody's watching

Much like “Nothing Shattered” was a necessary GLOW episode for Ruth’s character and the entire G.L.O.W. family, “The Good Twin” is also a necessary episode—just for the simple fact that it lets us finally know what a full episode of this world’s G.L.O.W. looks like. And god, it looks every bit as amazing as one could…

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