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Researchers are Launching a Final, Desperate Effort to Contact Rosetta’s Dead Comet Lander Researchers are Launching a Final, Desperate Effort to Contact Rosetta’s Dead Comet Lander

High above us, perched precariously on the cold surface of a comet, there sits one of the most technologically-advanced and singular machines humanity ever sent to hurtle up into space and stick its unlikely landing. And now that it’s there, it’s totally ignoring all our attempts to talk to it.

Catch up on the Rosetta Mission with an Adorable Claymation Clip

Haven’t stayed on top of the Rosetta mission? Learn about the spacecraft, lander, and what we’ve learned from the comet so far in under 3 minutes of charming stop motion.

This Jet From Rosetta's Comet was so Strong it Disrupted the Solar Wind

As Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko sneaks closer to the sun, the Rosetta orbiter is capturing dramatic outbursts from the ever-more active comet. This jet was so powerful, it momentarily out-puffed the solar wind, creating a rarely-observed diamagnetic cavity.

Images Show Size Of Philae's Comet By Dropping It On Europe's Cities Images Show Size Of Philae's Comet By Dropping It On Europe's Cities

We've already seen how Comet 67P, current home to the Philae Lander, compares in size to a Star Destroyer, but how does it compare to Earth's own cities? The European Space Agency helpfully improves our understanding of the comet by placing it over satellite photos of various European cities?

How Big Is Rosetta's Comet? How Big Is Rosetta's Comet?

Last night, Rosetta made the first of three burns to settle into orbit around comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. But, just how big is that lump of dirty snow? It is taller than Mount Fuji, big enough to hide a Borg Cube, and it would make a cozy home for a space slug.

First Close-Up Photos Of The Solar System's "Most Crazy Bonkers Comet" First Close-Up Photos Of The Solar System's "Most Crazy Bonkers Comet"

In March 2004, ESA's Rosetta spacecraft left Earth in pursuit of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Today, more than 10 years and four billion miles later, Rosetta became the first spacecraft in history to rendezvous with a comet. The probe is now soaring through space in tandem with its target – and the view is…

Rosetta, Are We There Yet?! Rosetta, Are We There Yet?!

After ten years of engineering, planning, and waiting, the Rosetta spacecraft is about to rendezvous with its comet. Weeks later, it'll send little lander Philea to screw into the rubber ducky of doom. I'm not even going to pretend I'm sleeping until Rosetta is in orbit.

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